Article List

Does sports massage have a significant impact on the process of recovery after maximal exercises?
Physiological Effect Of Massage On The Human Body
Simple delayed onset muscle soreness
Do pain receptors exist?
Critical vs. Clinical Thinking
Body Cells carry emotional memories.
Manual Therapy vs. Massage Therapy
What type of massage therapy should doctors refer their patients for treatments? Part 3
What type of massage therapy should doctors refer their patients for treatments? Part 2
Self-TMJ dysfunction treatment page
Science of Sports Massage
What type of massage therapy should doctors choose to refer their patients for treatments????
Is massage therapy recognized as a methodology of treatment?
Orthopedic massage – the concept and strategies
Teaching master classes
Continued Education with Medical Massage and Sports Massage
High-tech life style side-effects are significant and must be managed
Lymph Drainage for detoxification
Medical Massage and Control of Arterial Hypertension
A TRIGGER POINT IS NOT FORMATION OF FIBROCONNECTIVE TISSUE IN MUSCLES
Thoracic Outlet Syndrome Relief
Science of Massage and Energy Work
Sciatic Nerve Neuralgia
Reaction to Massage Procedure vs. Aggravation
Medical massage in cases of bronchial asthma
Four Strategies for Deep Tissue Massage
Clinical Psychology and Massage Therapy
“Frozen Shoulder” By Boris Prilutsky
Should Massage Therapists Use the Term “Medical” Massage
Incorporation of Hot Stone in treatments of Thoracic Outlet Syndrome
Pectoralis Stretch
Massage Therapy a beneficial tool in treating Fibromyalgia
Medical Massage for Jaw and Joint Disorders
Keep it Simple
Massage and Stress
Medical Stress Management Massage Therapy
Massage in Sitting Position
Post Isometric Relaxation
Steps for Cellulite Reduction Massage
Tensor Fasciae Latae Muscle Syndrome
Hip disorder
Stress management by Physical activities vs. Massage therapy.
Does Sports Massage Contribute to Post-Workout Recovery?
My views on continuing education for massage therapists
The role of Medical Massage in stress management, discovery of sexuality, and improvement of sexual satisfaction
Medical massage Therapy
Kneading Hands massage
Deep and dark secret
Neuromascular Reeducation

Blog List

Remembering about the uniqueness of massage therapy
Do you possess enough expertise and experience “to break my fascia?”/
There might be personal benefits in the act of sincere and active compassion
The uniqueness of massage therapy
Rehabilitation VS inhibition of symptoms
Managing stress on your own
Special price of today
Physiological bases of fascia mobilization
Rehabilitation VS inhibition of symptoms
Addressing lateral abdominal walls
Use of massage in case of a severe concussion
IS MASSAGE THERAPY AN “INNOCENT” PROCEDURE
IS MASSAGE THERAPY AN “INNOCENT” PROCEDURE 2
IS MASSAGE THERAPY AN “INNOCENT” PROCEDURE 3
IS MASSAGE THERAPY AN “INNOCENT” PROCEDURE 4

THE PLACEBO EFFECT AND ITS ROLE IN MASSAGE THERAPY PART II
Sentiments and emotions in the massage therapy field
THE PLACEBO EFFECT AND ITS ROLE IN MASSAGE
Be Careful! Words can damage
Twenty Years Later
It is the time to go back to the roots
With technological developments of testing equipment, we are getting a more scientific explanation on what we are doing
A massage therapist would never know if the case is reversible and treatable until she tries.

If the NFL uses it, must it be good?
“Pseudoscience VS. real clinical phenomena.” I respectfully disagree.
“Never play football?” I respectfully disagree.
plans-for-2017
Medical massage VS. bronchial asthma ???
I’ll do my best, but everything could happen
An injustice to Ray Rice
Post-Concussion Patient Testimonial
The History of medical massage
Out of scope of practice or just politics Part 3
Out of scope of practice or just politics Part 2
Out of scope of practice or just politics Part 1
A contemplation about “Concussion”
Diverticulitis and lower back pain

Specially designed medical massage protocol is the most powerful methodology for the management of concussions symptoms and much more. 
Is massage therapy, the remedy to all diseases?
Concerned about stress-related illnesses
The role of massage therapy in the treatment of difficult diseases
European Cranio-Sacral Therapy
The Power of Massage
My great five days at WMF Part 4
My great five days at WMF Part 3
My great five days at WMF Part 2
My great five days at WMF Part 1
Is it too late to rename “Prilutsky’s method of silicon jars massage to “Prilutsky’s method of fascia mobilizations using silicone jars?”

Interesting discussions at the AMTA CA annual education conference
“Active Engagement Techniques” with Whitney Lowe
Is it necessary to cross the line?
Do you speak your professional mind?
The role of medical massage in fighting pandemics of hypertension.
Are trigger points real, or this is a false claim that has no clinical value?
Lymphedemas can cause the development of neuropathy such as the one accompanying diabetes
Simplicity and extreme healing power of massage therapy.
I believe we all naturally born, it’s just important to realize.
Consuming antidepressants and Lyrica is not always the solution.
A little bit of good is in every bad

The role of coffee muck in cellulite reduction.
Patients reported outcome: Not all cases of sciatica are alike.
Increasing unwillingness to bear even small pains
Patient-Reported outcomes: Too much of a good thing.
Prilutsky’s Method of silicone jar massage. How it was developed.
Patients reported outcome: “In the beginning it helped, but then…”
Patients reported outcome: “There Will Be Blood”
“Prostitution VS. Massage therapy” Are we contributing to the confusion?

When pain, no gain
Unexpected usefulness of certain massage protocols
Clinical incidences could be educational
Common concept: Massage therapy /chiropractic procedure
Increase in blood supply triggered by massage
What separates a good therapist from a great one?
What is this simple approach to massage therapy and how is it different from other approaches?
The scientific community has given massage serious consideration only in the last 100 years.
Medical Massage is not a remedy for all diseases. Yet it is so powerful, that for the sake of one’s well-being, it cannot be ignored.

Critical Thinking vs. Clinical Thinking
The scientific community has given massage serious consideration only in the last 100 years.
What is this simple approach to massage therapy and how is it different from other approaches?
In time of panic or duress take moment to rationalize
Why painkillers could cause more headaches?
The Value of Abdominal Massage
Medical Massage vs Swedish massage
Can massage be promoted as detoxification methodology?

There might be personal benefits in sincere and active compassion

 

Like most people, forced by courante for inactivity, I was racking my brain on ways to be productive and if possible help to other people in that difficult time. Browsing the net, I got engaged in a discussion about the tools that we as massage therapists can use to help people who contracted a coronavirus infection with two massage therapists who read this post.

Boosting the immune system made simple

I finished the post with these two sentences: I believe it is important to learn a step-by-step, full-body lymphatic drainage acceleration techniques. It’s always important and especially important today. 

Now I’m thinking this is not enough. The subject of ”detoxification, and immune response” deserves a separate article written comprehensively, like we are saying, presenting a holistic view. Writing this article will keep me occupied and give an internal sense of peace and a sense of doing something right.

I’d like to encourage you to post your other requests, those covering the topic of ”detoxification, and immune response” or related to any other massage related topics, general or specifics.

As for myself… sitting at home, I decided to share my knowledge, to distract people, to help advance professional skills, etc. and while doing it I start realizing how beneficial it is for me, for my morals. I have tried to contribute and in the end, gained a piece of mind.

This sharing will keep our minds occupied, and push away heavy unproductive thoughts and, at the same time would allow us to concentrate on important subjects that otherwise remain marginalized in our busy everyday life.

In the meanwhile, I can say this. A massage therapist can help to a degree if a patient developed unusual difficult pneumonia. I will briefly discuss massage in cases of pneumonia and other respiratory diseases in that article. However, when someone has already been infected by a coronavirus we won’t be able to help, at least, at this point. The patients with cases of pneumonia secondary to coronavirus infection are in intensive care units.

When this pandemic dictated the entire nation to stay home, my management company asked what it might do for the massage community?

I recommended reducing the prices as much as possible on the educational materials. I was planning to write some educational commentaries, and we started working together.

As I stated, I don’t have a financial interest in all educational materials, and I thought it was very nice of them, to offer Vol. 5 for $10

http://medicalmassage-edu.com/volume-5-discount/

or offer instructional DVD + set of silicone jars for $34.95

http://medicalmassage-edu.com/volume-14-discount/

as well as post-concussion rehabilitation instructional DVD for $15

http://medicalmassage-edu.com/volume-15-discount/

God willing, soon we will have our normal lives back: go to work, and be productive. Let’s try to advance ourselves in our ability to help other people, who are suffering.

Thank God for all

Best Regards,

Boris

Remembering about the uniqueness of massage therapy

Hello friends!
I am of the opinion that massage therapists must remember about the great uniqueness of massage therapy when treating any disorders or dysfunctions.
Recently, a person from our fields, a friend of mine, posted this article on his site.

To me, the information presented in the article was a borderline distortion if not disinformation and I posted my considerations about it on his site.

Below I would like to share with you this what I have written there.

In my opinion, the aforementioned article was not written for massage therapists. In fact, it isn’t written for physical therapists or anybody who is applying physical methods of treatments.

As a massage therapist, I possess considerable clinical expertise and rich clinical experience in rehabilitation of post-concussions. The main goal of this rehabilitation is not the elimination of symptoms but the prevention of post-trauma brain dysfunction/encephalopathies. I would like to repeat not the elimination of symptoms only.

    1. “Neck musculature mass has been suggested as a biomechanical contributor to injury severity.” I hope we all agree that muscle mass cannot contribute to the severity. At least, this is not our professional language and approach.
    2. In my opinion, the sentence below represents the claim of health care professionals, who are radiologists, and who have never managed post-concussion rehabilitation:“Overall and individual muscle cross-sectional areas were correlated with symptom severity, neuropsychological testing, recovery time, and headache.”/p>Can MRI cross-sectional examination determine the high resting tone (tension) in all suboccipital muscles?

      No, this examination cannot.

      When treating painful skeletal muscular disorders, because of pain sensation, neighboring muscles immediately elevate the muscular tone even those that do not share the same innervations.

      When treating muscular syndromes such as piriformis muscles/sciatica, all gluteal muscles increase muscular tone. In the case of the head trauma/concussions, all neck muscles, including suboccipital muscles, are in the state of a protective muscular spasm. As massage therapists, we must address all of the surrounding muscles, in order to reduce tension, and achieve results. In the case of the buildup of tension in the fascia, massage therapists must address it too. We can release this tension. At the same time, because of this article, one might address rectus capitis posterior only, and thus never will be able to achieve real results.

      Unlike painkillers that only block pain impulse to reach the brain, one of the greatest unique features of massage therapy is in addressing the real causes that produce pain and disorders/dysfunctions. The same is true to say in cases of post-concussion rehabilitation.

      Below  is my article Rehabilitation VS inhibition of symptoms 

      If you won’t have much patience to read it in its entirety, then please read at least the summary and conclusion. It will give you a quick overview of how and why we as massage therapists can prevent encephalopathies/brain dysfunction.

      You’re welcome to challenge all that I stated in this post. Professional discussion can advance our level of professionalism.

Conclusions

1. I am of the opinion that massage therapists must remember about the great uniqueness of massage therapy when treating any disorders/dysfunctions. Our methods are not similar to painkillers that block pain impulses from reaching the brain but address the real causes that producing pain, and other dysfunctions.

2. Just because the article is published at PubMED.gov, it doesn’t mean that this article is written for massage therapists and/or this is good and scientifically valid material. Some time ago PubMED.gov published this article 

Massage Impairs Postexercise Muscle Blood Flow and “Lactic Acid” Removal

Please Google:” Massage Impairs Post-exercise Muscle Blood Flow and ‘‘Lactic Acid’’ Removal” and you will find many other “scientific publications” repeating the same nonsense, Massage Impairs Post-exercise Muscle Blood flow”??????

In truth, the mere fact of something being published in PubMED.gov doesn’t guarantee it is a reliable material and could, in fact, be absolute nonsense.

Summary

Even today, doctors practice suboccipital injections, be it Botox/toxin injection, or corticosteroids hormones injections. Can it inhibit pain? In some cases, it can. Does it address causes that lead to encephalopathies? Positively not.

In mild traumatic brain injury, the rectus capitis posterior minor is the only suboccipital muscle whose cross-sectional area is associated with symptom severity and worse outcome. Given the unique connection of this muscle to the dura, this finding may suggest that pathology of the myodural bridge contributes to symptomatology and prognosis in mild traumatic brain injury.

To make the aforementioned claim, by all scientific standards, the researchers should first assess autonomic activities, and only then administrate these injections.

One cannot do Botox/toxin or corticosteroid injections nonstop and then, after a minimum of four months of observation, do a test of autonomic activities again. The test must be run much more frequently especially in view of the fact that test equipment can assess the irregularity or normalizations of the autonomic system rather quickly. Only when the test would establish normalization of the autonomic activities, anyone can claim what they claimed in this article.

Besides, why use the injections? Injections that have side effects. When it comes to muscular tone,  by means of massage, we can achieve sustainable results without side effects, and in a relatively short time.

Best wishes,

Boris.

 

Do you possess enough expertise and experience to break my fascia?

Below is  my blog about this bizarre request “to break fascia.” In this blog, I am not only presenting this case, but also explaining fascia/muscles relations, pathophysiology, and much more. In addition, I am providing information about the historical developer of this methodology. It’s a fascinating story.

“Breaking fascia” is not the only special memory that I have about fascia misunderstandings. Several years ago, there was a lot of excitement around the fascia congress. Many of my friends and students attended. I have the graduates, a group of personal trainers, who attended my school and for many years, they combined personal training with practicing massage. Through them, I received a lot of information about fascia congress.

I asked one of the attendees: ”why no one at Congress mentioned the name of Elizabeth Dickle, who made known the importance of tension build-up in the connective tissue/fascia and its impact on chronic somatic and visceral abnormalities to the scientific community.

He answered that this Congress wasn’t for massage therapists. I asked was it for personal trainers? I didn’t get a clear answer. It’s okay.

In fact, this brief commentary, it is specifically FOR massage therapists

 

Five years ago or so, I received a call from a patient referred by MD. Her first question was: “Do you possess enough expertise and experience to break my fascia?” 😊

Jokingly I answered: “I’m in the business of repairing, and not breaking.” Regrettably, she felt that my humor was not appropriate and angrily retorted: ”Boris, I have developed myofascial tissue problem. For two months, I was seeing “fascia chiropractor”, and little by little started feeling much worse. Now my pain us not only in the scapula, but traveling to my arm, and I cannot sleep at night because of pain. In the beginning, it wasn’t like this, I could sleep without pain. Of course, I asked what chiropractor did, the answer was:” he tried to break my fascia, but my case is difficult and he couldn’t succeed. My primary care physician believes you can do it.”

To tell you the truth I don’t know where the terminology “breaking fascia” and “myofascial tissue” come from. No book of histology will support the existence of myofascial tissue. We have fascia and muscle alliance, an anatomical unit that is working together. Yet, histologically speaking, these are different tissues. Fascia is a connective tissue, which means fibers of fascia have no potential to constrict while the function of muscles is to constrict. I have invited her for treatment, and using a very convincing tone of voice, told her: ”clinical picture as you described, can be the result of buildups of tension within fascia and muscles. I possess the expertise to detect these abnormalities and eliminate this tension, in which case you can feel much better.

It was a difficult mechanical pain case. In addition, the patient exhibited anterior scalene muscle syndrome that triggered a neurological picture, radiating pain to the upper extremity.  During the first five treatments performing connective tissue massage/fascia release and mobilization techniques, trigger point therapy, and massage techniques addressing muscles I have achieved positive change in the clinical picture. The patient could sleep at night, experienced no radiating pain to the upper extremity, was free of pain movement of the neck and upper back. Of course, I convinced her to continue treatments in order to increase the threshold of muscular irritability. She agreed, and I have provided seven more treatments. Since then, during all these years I treated her sciatic nerve neuralgia, and knee sprain/strain type of injury. Today she is doing well. Her neck and upper back symptoms have never come back.

Briefly “About muscles /fascia”

Fascia surrounds each muscle, hosts pathways for nerves and blood vessels, participates in a nutritional supply, provides support for muscles when they are under a significant load. For example, when a biceps constricts, flexes forearm, lifts weight, fascia supports biceps action by sharing the load. Still, it is connective tissue; fibers cannot constrict. The physiology of movement relies on a constriction of muscles. Flexion, extension, stabilizations are the results of muscular constrictions. At the time of the movement relaxation in muscles happening due to action of antagonism as muscles cannot relax by themselves.

Due to the negative effects of stress, physical activities, irritation of spinal nerves, etc., muscles can build tension, expressed in shortening of muscles. When muscles build up tension and especially pathological tension, massage techniques especially kneading, can stimulate the decrease of muscular tension while passive stretching can affect buildups of tension in muscles.

However, kneading and passive stretching have no effect on abnormally tense fascia. Being a connective tissue, fascia has no blood vessels anatomical structure. Of course, cells of connective tissue need blood supply like any other cell in our body. Blood vessels in neighboring muscles, release these supplies, and connective tissue cell membrane allowed to this supply in. This process is called diffusion. When muscles build up tension, blood vessels also constrict, thus making insufficient blood supply, to the fascia. If the insufficient blood supply to the fascia lasts a long time, it leads to tension build up in fascia. This tension is not the result of fibers shortening (as fascia fibers have no potential to constrict) but is the result of wrinkle- like buildup of tension.

To successfully stretch fascia, one needs to pull tense fascia in different directions mechanically. Without releasing buildups of tension in the fascia, it is impossible to sustain normal resting tone in muscles, to prevent reactivation of trigger points, etc. In turn, it makes it impossible to help people who suffer from different painful skeletal muscular disorders.

The inhibition of pain doesn’t imply adequate rehabilitation and sustainable results. Failure to achieve sustainable results would lead to pathology, including faster developments of osteoarthritis, and other degenerative diseases such as tendinosis, developments of muscular syndromes, etc. Besides, even if the pain is inhibited, one shouldn’t expect that the patient will be free of pain, no flare-ups, and will be restored desirable functional abilities.

History of connective tissue massage.

The works of Austrian physical therapist Elizabeth Dickle made known to the scientific community the importance of tension build-up in the connective tissue/fascia and its impact on chronic somatic and visceral abnormalities.

As with many important discoveries, Dickle’s discovery was an accidental find. For several years, she suffered a failure of arterial circulation in her lower extremities resulting from Thromboangiitis Obliterans. The disease had progressed to the stage when amputation became a real possibility. Dickle also experienced chronic, lower back pain caused by her limping. While rubbing her lower back and trying to relieve tension, she noticed sensations of warmth and weak pulsations in her feet. Intrigued by her finding, she started using various techniques on her lower back. She noticed that pulling the skin on her lower back triggered the most intense warm sensations in her feet. After several months of self-therapy, she was able to restore circulation through her lower extremities and prevented double amputation. Powerful stuff!

Dickle shared her findings with Prof. W. Kohlrausch. Their combined efforts, as well as the later works of Prof. N. Veil and Dr. Luebe in Austrian and German clinics, shaped a major method of somatic rehabilitation they called Bidegewebsmassage or connective tissue massage/fascia release and mobilization techniques as it is known by the rest of the world.

During the extensive research, they developed connective tissue massage/fascia release and mobilization hands-on protocols, including the stipulation regarding the direction of movement. This was presented in a straightforward way so that thousands of massage therapists could learn these techniques and, successfully, implement them on patients. Thousands were replicating their outcomes when treating back and limp disorders, internal organ diseases, etc.

The work of Prof. Sherback, which is a fundamental plateau for medical massage, is also a fundamental groundwork for any massage therapy. Today, the concepts that lay the foundation of his works were tested and massively utilized for many years, and thus proved their clinical viability.

You’re welcome to post questions, agreements, and disagreements.

You’re also welcome, to watch videos, where I demonstrate the utilization of silicone jars for fascia release and mobilizations. It is very powerful.

Best wishes,

Boris

 

Volume #14 Discount – Medical Massage

The uniqueness of massage therapy

 

Hello Friends,

Five years ago or so, I received a call from a patient. Her first question was: “Do you possess enough expertise and experience to break my fascia?” 😊 Jokingly I answered: “I’m in the business of repairing, and not breaking.”

“To break fascia” Below is the link to my blog about this bizarre request. In this blog, I am not only presenting this case, but also explaining fascia/muscles relations, pathophysiology, and much more. In addition, I am providing information about the historical developer of this methodology. It’s a fascinating story.

“Breaking fascia” is not the only special memory that I have about fascia. Several years ago, there was a lot of excitement around the fascia congress. Many of my friends and students attended this congress.  For example, a group of personal trainers, who graduated from my school, and combined personal training with practicing massage. Through them, I received a lot of information about fascia congress.

I asked one of the attendees: ”why no one at Congress mentioned the name of Elizabeth Dickle. This doctor made known the importance of tension build-up in the connective tissue/fascia and its impact on chronic somatic and visceral abnormalities to the scientific community.

He answered that this Congress wasn’t for massage therapists.

That is another reason for my post about fascia.  In fact, it is specifically FOR massage therapists.

For those who are interested, click  this

My management company, kindly offered a set of silicone jars(4 pieces ) and an instructional DVD, for $34.95. (regular price is $69.95)

To go to the clearance page click the picture

Recently, a person from our fields, a friend of mine, posted this article on his site.

Effect of the Suboccipital Musculature on Symptom Severity and Recovery After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

To me, the information presented in the article was a borderline distortion if not disinformation and I posted my considerations about it on his site.

Below I would like to share with you this what I have written there.

In my opinion, the aforementioned article was not written for massage therapists. In fact, it isn’t written for physical therapists or anybody who is applying physical methods of treatments.

As a massage therapist, I possess considerable clinical expertise and rich clinical experience in rehabilitation of post-concussions. The main goal of this rehabilitation is not the elimination of symptoms but the prevention of post-trauma brain dysfunction/encephalopathies. I would like to repeat not the elimination of symptoms only.

    1. “Neck musculature mass has been suggested as a biomechanical contributor to injury severity.” I hope we all agree that muscle mass cannot contribute to the severity. At least, this is not our professional language and approach.
    2. In my opinion, the sentence below represents the claim of health care professionals, who are radiologists, and who have never managed post-concussion rehabilitation:

      “Overall and individual muscle cross-sectional areas were correlated with symptom severity, neuropsychological testing, recovery time, and headache.”/p>

      Can MRI cross-sectional examination determine the high resting tone (tension) in all suboccipital muscles?

      No, this examination cannot.

      When treating painful skeletal muscular disorders, because of pain sensation, neighboring muscles immediately elevate the muscular tone even those that do not share the same innervations.

      When treating muscular syndromes such as piriformis muscles/sciatica, all gluteal muscles increase muscular tone. In the case of the head trauma/concussions, all neck muscles, including suboccipital muscles, are in the state of a protective muscular spasm. As massage therapists, we must address all of the surrounding muscles, in order to reduce tension, and achieve results. In the case of the buildup of tension in the fascia, massage therapists must address it too. We can release this tension. At the same time, because of this article, one might address rectus capitis posterior only, and thus never will be able to achieve real results.

      Unlike painkillers that only block pain impulse to reach the brain, one of the greatest unique features of massage therapy is in addressing the real causes that produce pain and disorders/dysfunctions. The same is true to say in cases of post-concussion rehabilitation.

      Below  is my article Rehabilitation VS inhibition of symptoms 

      If you won’t have much patience to read it in its entirety, then please read at least the summary and conclusion. It will give you a quick overview of how and why we as massage therapists can prevent encephalopathies/brain dysfunction.

      You’re welcome to challenge all that I stated in this post. Professional discussion can advance our level of professionalism.

Conclusions

1. I am of the opinion that massage therapists must remember about the great uniqueness of massage therapy when treating any disorders/dysfunctions. Our methods are not similar to painkillers that block pain impulses from reaching the brain but address the real causes that producing pain, and other dysfunctions.

2. Just because the article is published at PubMED.gov, it doesn’t mean that this article is written for massage therapists and/or this is good and scientifically valid material. Some time ago PubMED.gov published this article 

Massage Impairs Postexercise Muscle Blood Flow and “Lactic Acid” Removal

Please Google:” Massage Impairs Post-exercise Muscle Blood Flow and ‘‘Lactic Acid’’ Removal” and you will find many other “scientific publications” repeating the same nonsense, Massage Impairs Post-exercise Muscle Blood flow”??????

In truth, the mere fact of something being published in PubMED.gov doesn’t guarantee it is a reliable material and could, in fact, be absolute nonsense.

Summary

Even today, doctors practice suboccipital injections, be it Botox/toxin injection, or corticosteroids hormones injections. Can it inhibit pain? In some cases, it can. Does it address causes that lead to encephalopathies? Positively not.

In mild traumatic brain injury, the rectus capitis posterior minor is the only suboccipital muscle whose cross-sectional area is associated with symptom severity and worse outcome. Given the unique connection of this muscle to the dura, this finding may suggest that pathology of the myodural bridge contributes to symptomatology and prognosis in mild traumatic brain injury.

To make the aforementioned claim, by all scientific standards, the researchers should first assess autonomic activities, and only then administrate these injections.

One cannot do Botox/toxin or corticosteroid injections nonstop and then, after a minimum of four months of observation, do a test of autonomic activities again. The test must be run much more frequently especially in view of the fact that test equipment can assess the irregularity or normalizations of the autonomic system rather quickly. Only when the test would establish normalization of the autonomic activities, anyone can claim what they claimed in this article.

Besides, why use the injections? Injections that have side effects. When it comes to muscular tone,  by means of massage, we can achieve sustainable results without side effects, and in a relatively short time.

Best wishes,

Boris.